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SAMe

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SAMe

sku: 513060

As a donator of methyl groups, SAMe supports glutathione production, liver health, musculoskeletal and joint comfort, and a positive mood.

Available In: Tablets
60 CT
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S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is the active methyl form of the amino acid methionine. SAMe is necessary for an array of biochemical pathways, including neurotransmitter synthesis, metabolism of homocysteine, and detoxification. As a donator of methyl groups, SAMe supports glutathione production, liver health, musculoskeletal and joint comfort, and a positive mood.

Suggested Use:

1-2 capsules two times per day or as recommended by your health care professional.

  • Provides Mood Support
  • Supports Musculoskeletal Health
  • Supports Liver Health

SAMe

SAMe is a principle methyl donor for biochemical reactions throughout the body. This methyl transfer, is critical to reactions involving proteins, phospholipids, DNA, RNA, creatine, hormones, development of cell membranes, degradation of histamine, and formation of norepinephrine and dopamine. Once methyl groups have been removed or donated, SAMe is converted into homocysteine. Homocysteine can either be recycled back into methonine (a process known as transmethylation, which is dependent on vitamin B12 and folate), or metabolized via trans-sulfuration (a vitamin B6 and betaine dependent pathway), to eventually contribute to reduced glutathione and taurine production. These pathways rely heavily on sufficient stores of these B vitamins.

Folate

Folate is a water-soluble member of the B-complex vitamins that is critical for maintaining optimal methylation pathways. Malabsorption and genetic defects in the enzyme 5-methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (5-MTHFR) can result in an impaired ability to activate folic acid. Folic acid, in combination with vitamin B12, supports the trans-methylation pathway, which metabolizes homocysteine into cysteine. Increases in oxidative stress may shift homocysteine metabolism towards trans-sulfuration to increase hepatic production of reduced glutathione.

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